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Gospel Of Luke

The Gospel of Luke


The Apostle Luke wrote the Book of Luke as an account of the Life of Jesus. Here are all you resources regarding the Gospel of Luke. You can also find more information at The Books of the Bible.

Resource Guide
Luke Bible Study
Commentaries on Luke


The Apostle Luke Wrote The Gospel of Luke

The second book of the New Testament - Luke's Gospel was indeed written by the Apostle Luke. He wrote it as an account of the Life of Jesus Christ, but from the scholarly authority of a historian, a devout follower of Christ, and a man of medicine. Hence his great attention to detail, and careful consideration of the impact of his work on the end-reader. The entire book can be summarized in Luke's one statement about Christ: "Who went about doing good, and healing all that were oppressed..." (Luke 4:18; compare Acts 10:38).

Unlike the other Gospel writers; Matthew, Mark, and John - Luke does not claim to have been an eye-witness of our Lord's ministry, but he does claim to have gone to the best sources of information within his reach, and to have written an orderly narrative of the facts (Luke 1:1-4). The authors of the first three Gospels, referred to as the Synoptics, wrote independently of each other. Each wrote his independent narrative under the guidance of the Holy Spirit.

Each of the writers has some things, both in matter and style, peculiar to himself, yet all the three have much in common. Because of the extremely defined nature of Luke's Gospel, it has been called:

  • "the Gospel of the nations, full of mercy and hope, assured to the world by the love of a Suffering Savior;"
  • "the Gospel of the saintly life;"
  • "the Gospel for the Greeks;"
  • "the Gospel of the future;"
  • "the Gospel of progressive Christianity, of the universality and gratuitousness of the gospel;"
  • "the historic Gospel;"
  • "the Gospel of Jesus as the good Physician and the Saviour of mankind;"
  • "the "Gospel of the Fatherhood of God and the brotherhood of man;"
  • "the Gospel of womanhood;"
  • "the Gospel of the outcast. Stories of the Samaritan, the publican, the harlot, and the prodigal;"
  • and..."the Gospel of tolerance."

Some interesting facts about the book of Luke:

  • The book contains 24 Chapters
  • It records 25 different parables Jesus told.
  • Of over 30 miracles in the Gospels, Luke records 15.
  • Many commonly searched for stories or topics appear in Luke, such as:
    • The Birth of John the Baptist (Lk 1:57-80)
    • 12 Year old Jesus at the Temple (Lk 2:41-52)
    • Jesus Calls the First Disciples (Lk 5:1-11)
    • The Centurions Great Faith (Lk 7:1-10)
    • "Who Will Be Greatest In Heaven?" (Lk 9:46-50)
    • Mary and Martha (Lk 10:38-42)
    • Jesus' Teaching on Prayer (Lk 11:2-11)
    • Peter Denies Christ 3 Times (Lk 22:54-62)
    • Risen Christ Appears (Lk 24:13-35)
  • Luke contains a total of 1151 verses
  • Luke shares verse content with Matthew and Mark in nearly precisely identical language. There are:
    • 389 in common with both Matthew and Mark,
    • 176 in common with Matthew alone,
    • 41 in common with Mark alone,
    • leaving 544 peculiar to Luke himself.
  • There are seventeen of our Lord's parables peculiar to this Gospel.
  • Also there are seven of our Lord's miracles which Luke records, that are omitted by Matthew and Mark.

Mark has 7 peculiarities, 93 coincidences. Matthew 42 peculiarities, 58 coincidences. Luke 59 peculiarities, 41 coincidences. In other words about 93% of Mark, 57% of Matthew, and 40% of Luke are taken up describing the same stories, facts, details, places and people and encounters, in very similar if not identical language.

Luke the Evangelist
Who were the intended readers and what was Luke's intended purpose for his gospel? The Gospel of Luke was first of all intended for Theophilus, who is addressed as "most excellent Theophilus" in 1:3, and is also mentioned in Acts 1:1. We have no means of determining who Theophilus was. It has been supposed by some that the name was a general one, applied to every Christian, as a beloved one or a friend of God. But the general opinion now is, and rightly so, that it is the name of an individual, probably a Greek. It is generally agreed, however, that the Gospel was not intended for Theophilus only, but was simply addressed to him as the representative of a large circle of readers.

The purpose of Luke is clearly stated in the preface, that Theophilus and the Gentile readers in general might know the certainty of those things, wherein they had been instructed, 1:4. It is his desire to present clearly the truth of all Gospel facts. In order to do this, and as a good doctor would, he aims at fullness of treatment. He mentions the names not only of the principal actors in the Gospel history, but others who were in any way connected with it. He brings Gospel facts in relation with secular history, and carefully describes the impressions of Christ's teachings upon the hearers. From the contents of the Gospel we may further gather that it was the author's nearer purpose to present Christ in a very acceptable way to the Greeks, referring to "...the perfect man", as the sympathetic friend of the afflicted and the poor, and as the Saviour of the world, seeking those that are lost (Luke 7:36-50). - from the Easton's Bible Dictionary

Luke the Doctor
It is historically and Biblically accepted that Luke was a physician. He was fluent in the medical vocabulary of his time. For example in the incident where the boy is said to be "..thrown down…" (Luke 4:35), Luke uses the Greek medical term for convulsions. In the incident where the distraught father cries to Jesus, "..Look upon my son!" (Luke 9:38), the word Luke used for "look upon" was actually the same medical term used of a physician seeing a patient. Like most physicians Luke was understandably defensive of his profession. In Luke 8:43,44 when the woman, "..with an issue of blood..", approaches Jesus, Matthew and Mark write that she had exhausted all her savings on physicians but was no better. Dr. Luke tells us the same story, but chooses to omit the part about the costly but ineffective medical treatments.

In Luke 4:38 our physician adds the word 'great' to the fever diagnoses. He also tells us that the sick woman's friends besought Jesus and did not merely tell Him of her. It is possible Luke inferred that to Christ's ear the telling of His servants' woes is a prayer for His help? Oddly, yet not without explanation Luke never mentions Christ's touch, which Mark and Matthew both note. One might speculate that Luke is more intrigued by the fact that Jesus merely speaks, and healing takes place, which is even more of a credible proof of Jesus Divine healing. He did not merely apply some readily available ancient formula, thus performing the first-century equivalent of 'outpatient surgery'. As a true physician, Luke was even more amazed than anyone that it was not Jesus' touch that healed, it was His WORD!

Luke the Artist
There are Christian traditions which have surfaced in places around the globe which purport that Luke was an artist, and the very first iconic painter. An "Icon Painter" is someone who paints portraits of iconic Christian figures, such as the Virgin Mary, or Peter, or the Apostle Paul.

The story goes that Luke painted the very first portraits of Mary and Jesus, and of Peter, and Paul. There are medieval artists guilds in such cities as Flanders, and the Accademia di San Luca ("Academy of St Luke") in Rome, commemorating St Luke as an artist.

Tradition that Luke painted icons of Mary and Jesus are common, particularly in Eastern Orthodoxy. The tradition also has support from the Saint Thomas Christians of India who claim to still have one of the Theotokos icons that St Luke painted and Thomas brought to India. The most famous of these paintings is the The Black Madonna of Częstochowa or Our Lady of Vladimir, also known as the Matka Boska Częstochowska in Polish, and Imago thaumaturga Beatae Virginis Mariae Immaculatae Conceptae, in Claro Monte in Latin. That particular painting of the Virgin Mary is both Poland's holiest relic, and one of the country's national symbols.

The Gospel of Luke can best be summarized in Luke 19:5-10; The Story of Zacchaeus


(5)When Jesus reached the spot, he looked up and said to him, "Zacchaeus, come down immediately. I must stay at your house today." (6)So he came down at once and welcomed him gladly. (7)All the people saw this and began to mutter, "He has gone to be the guest of a 'sinner.’"
(8)But Zacchaeus stood up and said to the Lord, "Look, Lord! Here and now I give half of my possessions to the poor, and if I have cheated anybody out of anything, I will pay back four times the amount."
(9)Jesus said to him, "Today salvation has come to this house, because this man, too, is a son of Abraham.

(10)For the Son of Man came to seek and to save what was lost."



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About DeeperShopping

Account & Orders
Track My Orders
My Account
Gift Certificates

Email Newsletters
Subscribe Email
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Help
Help Center
Returning Products
Email Customer Service

Resources
Link To Us
Homeschool Brands
Sitemap

Make Money With Us
Become an Affiliate
Sell Your Ebooks

Artisan Profiles
Christian Authors
Christian Music Artists
Artisan Biography Center

DeeperShopping Books

Toll-Free 1-888-433-3788
Weekdays 10am - 5pm EST
International +1-678-546-9300

Corporate Address
4280 Brogdon Exchange, Suite B
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